Timothy Goudge

    The University of Texas at Austin

    Areas of Interest: Planetary surface processes, mechanical & chemical erosion, Fluvial geomorphology, volcanic island geology, tectonics & uplift, land-climate-ocean feedbacks.

    Name Timothy Goudge
    Role Assistant Professor
    Institution The University of Texas at Austin 
    Contact tgoudge@jsg.utexas.edu
    Key Words / Areas of Interest Planetary surface processes, mechanical & chemical erosion, Fluvial geomorphology, volcanic island geology, tectonics & uplift, land-climate-ocean feedbacks.
    Expertise Sought We seek collaborators with expertise in volcanic island geology, hydrology, geochronology, and/or geophysics, in particular focusing on the Azores and Madeira. We are interested in an increased understanding of feedbacks between deep-earth mechanisms, which drive tectonic uplift and island formation, and surface processes and erosional histories, as influenced by climate, sea level, and topographic boundary conditions. Collaborators who are familiar with field geology, sampling techniques, and mapping, in particular in basaltic terrains and lava formations, would be particularly valuable to our research goals. We hope to work with researchers who are open to incorporating a complex coupling of climate, erosion, and tectonophysics at a variety of scales, both in space and time.

     

    Bio:

    Tim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at UT Austin. He received his BSc from Queen’s University, and his ScM and PhD from Brown University. His group’s research focuses on the use of remote sensing data (spaceborne and airborne) to study the signature of surface processes recorded in the topography, mineralogy, and sedimentary rock record of Mars, Earth, and other planetary bodies. Of particular interest is understanding how surface processes interact with varying planetary-scale boundary conditions (e.g., climate, sea level, topographic structure), which are constrained through comparative studies of surface processes across planetary bodies in our solar system. A key approach for this research is the study of analogs to landscapes on other planets accessible to us on Earth (e.g. volcanic islands, arctic regions) both in the field and with remote sensing data. For more information, see Dr. Goudge’s group research website: https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/goudge/